Salzburg Global Chronicle 2015 » Features
A Historic Jewel - Not Preserved In Amber
A Historic Jewel - Not Preserved In Amber
Louise Hallman 
Built by a Prince-Archbishop in 1736, and once home to Austrian theater impresario Max Reinhardt, Schloss Leopoldskron today is owned by Salzburg Global Seminar. As stewards of this magnificent estate, Salzburg Global and its supporters have invested time, money, and loving care in maintaining the Schloss, its accompanying Meierhof, and the surrounding 17-acre sculpture garden and park as an inspirational place where free inquiry and expression abide. As Karl Lagerfeld strutted through the Venetian Room of Schloss Leopoldskron in December 2014 to unveil his Austrian-inspired Chanel collection for gathered fashionistas and press, it was a crowning moment on what had been a momentous year for Schloss Leopoldskron and its owner, Salzburg Global Seminar. Since purchasing the 18th century palace over half a century ago, Salzburg Global Seminar has sought to renew and maintain the rococo splendor of this historic site, provide a unique environment for its international programs for transformative change, and generate revenue to support its mission: challenging current and future leaders to solve issues of global concern. That a non-profit organization owns an opulent palace might at first seem incongruous. Indeed, upon its founding in 1947, there was no certainty there would be a second session, much less a permanent location. A serendipitous reunion on the New York subway between one of Salzburg Global’s three co-founders, Clemens Heller and Helene Thimig, widow of Austrian theater impresario Max Reinhardt, the Schloss’ pre-war owner, led to an offer of the palace’s use. Heller, like Reinhardt, had fled Austria with his family following the Nazi Anschluss of Austria in 1938. Inspired by the USA’s European Recovery Program named for Secretary of State George Marshall, Heller conceived a “Marshall Plan for the Mind.” Thimig, widowed while she and Reinhardt were living in exile, had no desire to take up residency again in Salzburg. Inspired by Heller’s passion, she loaned the Schloss for the first Salzburg Seminar in American Studies. The organizers of that 1947 summer session arrived to find a Schloss in abandonment following its Nazi occupation during the Second World War. Neither indoor plumbing nor electric lights were working. Windows had been shattered, chandeliers destroyed, exterior stucco and interior walls riddled with holes when a bomb had landed in the Schloss Park. To ready the Schloss for the arrival of 102 Fellows from 18 countries, window panes were sourced from Czechoslovakia, plumbing supplies from Italy, and scores of mattresses, iron cots, and tables from the Red Cross and from the occupying American army, together with food parcels from CARE in Switzerland. The majority of the Fellows slept together in one large dormitory in what is now the Robison Gallery on the top floor of the Schloss, with others taking up beds in what are now the Seminar Rooms named for the three visionary founders, Austrian Clemens Heller, and Americans, Scott Elledge and Richard “Dick” Campbell. For the next 67 years there was steady improvement, room by room, brick by brick, as funds could be raised. Today, the Schloss, the neighboring Meierhof, and the surrounding gardens reflect much of their former glory. The latest chapter in this ongoing story involves the Meierhof, which predates the Schloss and was once home of the surrounding farm, and then to the estate’s stables and servants’ quarters. After its purchase in 1973, the Meierhof underwent extensive renovation in 1988 which saw the creation of 55 individual guest rooms, a lecture hall, library and café, and later offices to house the staff. By 2014, the hotel guest rooms were in need of a facelift to make them competitive with other conference facilities and to attract external guests and events when Salzburg Global programs were in adjournment. With financing supplied by an international consortium of 25 individual supporters, including members of Salzburg Global’s international board of directors and long-serving Salzburg Global Fellows, an extensive two-month renovation commenced in January 2014. Hallways were widened, new bathrooms added, bedrooms completely refurnished and wireless internet installed throughout, bringing the 17th century building firmly into the 21st century. In a nod to history, the Meierhof’s modern bedrooms feature Schloss window shutters retrieved from the attic and recycled as attractive headboards, as well as exposed wooden beams, previously concealed by drop ceilings. Reflecting the building’s Hollywood connections as filming location for the Oscar-winning movie, the renovated Meierhof also includes three The Sound of Music themed rooms. The remodeled hallways are decorated with photos from Reinhardt’s theater and film productions. The refurbished café features photos from Salzburg Global’s seven-decade history – as well as locally produced beers, wines and spirits, and cakes freshly baked every day in the Schloss. Since its official reopening in June 2014, the newly named “Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron,” which combines the 55 bedrooms of the Meierhof and the 12 suites of the Schloss, has won rave reviews and international awards, including “Best Historic Hotel of Europe Ambassador 2015.” Daniel Szelényi joined Salzburg Global Seminar as Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron’s General Manager in June 2013 and has been a driving force behind its transformation. “From the moment I first walked through the wrought iron gates, I was mesmerized by the fascinating aura of Schloss Leopoldskron,” said Szelényi, “And leading the property through its transformation to become ‘Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron’ has been a wonderful and rewarding challenge.” Speaking at the reopening celebration, Salzburg Global Seminar President Stephen L. Salyer said: “The commitment of those who love this place and believe in this organization’s work allows this historic jewel to maintain its luster, not preserved in amber but as a living, working space.” The challenge of maintaining Schloss Leopoldskron’s historic heritage while operating as a “living, working space” has inspired another partnership crucial to the organization’s stewardship effort. Funded by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, which focuses exclusively on the education and training of those who conserve 18th century European art, and thanks to the initiative of Salzburg Global Fellow Debbie Hess Norris of the University of Delaware, the Schloss Leopoldskron Conservation Assessment Program was launched in 2013. Assembling an outstanding team of graduate students from New York University and the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation, Dr. Hannelore Roemich has led summer programs at Schloss Leopoldskron in 2013 and 2014. Her team has cataloged on-site art, furniture and architectural features, and advised on ways to conserve the Schloss’ heritage even as it operates as a hotel and world-leading strategic convener. As a result of the studies and related recommendations, Salzburg Global has established a collections management team which includes staff members from both the hotel and program sides of the organization. After their first visit in 2013, Roemich and her team outlined several concerns, including excessive light levels that could produce severe damage to valuable prints and progressive damage from use of candles to the mirrored walls and ceiling of the Venetian Room – a Reinhardt creation and the inspiration for the ballroom set design in The Sound of Music. Upon her return last summer, Roemich remarked on the progress made: “We are very proud that some of the easy, low-cost recommendations have been implemented such as restricting the policy for candles. Management is taking our work very seriously and this is a very positive aspect and is very encouraging for what we are doing.” The Kress Foundation has renewed its partnership with Salzburg Global for 2015, with a third team of students arriving in July to complete remaining assessments, and to prepare restoration proposals to be shared with possible funding agencies and private donors. In recent years, Salzburg Global has received support from the Austrian Federal Government for the restoration of the Schloss Park, including statuary installed by Max Reinhardt in the 1920s. In the intervening years, the park had become overgrown, hiding the manicured lawns and dozens of Baroque statues that defined its former glory. The presence of the statues raised the interest of the Austrian Federal Office for the Protection of Monuments. Since 2001, the agency has contributed a total of EUR 200,000 for the restoration of over half of the 50 statues uncovered in the 900m² garden. Additional investment has come from friends of Salzburg Global Seminar. Most recently, a crowdfunding project was launched to restore “Leo & Mo, ”the stone seahorses dating from Reinhardt’s time and made famous by the boat scene in The Sound of Music. “Monuments tell stories,” said Ronald Gobiet, head of the Federal Office for the Protection of Monuments in Salzburg and long-time supporter of the project, at the 2012 unveiling of the statues on Austria’s national “Tag des Denkmals” – Monuments Day. Now, thanks to the ongoing efforts of Salzburg Global’s house and garden team, these sculptures, vases, fountains, and monuments will continue to share their stories. Reinhardt’s elaborate garden plan also included an outdoor stage with orchestra pit, gallery and auditorium seating. More than 80 years after Reinhardt’s own opening night of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream was called off due to heavy rain, the Schloss Park was again home to theater in 2014 with a summer-long staging of Lovers and Fools, scenes from Shakespearean plays, performed by actors from the Salzburger Landestheater (Salzburg State Theater). A sell-out success, unhindered by the changeable Salzburg weather, the production will return to the Schloss in the summer of 2015. “Creativity underpins our heritage and the collaborations we inspire,” said Clare Shine, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer and former theater critic for the Financial Times. “This joyous Shakespeare in the Park production revealed the ‘power of place’ that so enchants our Fellows and guests. ‘Fairies’ took the audience on a magical promenade from comedy to tragedy, from a dripping Romeo charging out of the lake to an acrobatic lovers’ chase in the treetops. The ethereal beauty of madrigals sung by young Salzburg singers comes back to me every time I sit on the terrace.” This connection to theater encouraged Karl Lagerfeld to select Schloss Leopoldskron for the Salzburg leg of his highly successful “Paris-Salzburg-New York 2014/15 Metiers d’Art collection” show. “I know Schloss Leopoldskron very well,” Lagerfeld said. “We took great photos here 26 years ago… For me, the Schloss belongs to the history of the German-language theater and culture between 1920 and 1938, together with Max Reinhardt. These things are very dear to my heart.” (Indeed, so dear is Schloss Leopoldskron to him that Lagerfeld had several elements of the palace recreated in New York for his later show.) For the main show, held in Salzburg, the entire second floor of the palace was transformed into an unorthodox catwalk with models parading down the stairs to the Venetian Room and White Room, through the Marble Hall, to the Chinese Room and the Max Reinhardt Library. Chanel repaired and polished floors, repainted rooms, refitted soft furnishings and refixed details, hiding away 21st century additions such as power cables, radiators and WiFi hubs. (Their requests to repair the holes in the murals of the Chinese Room, long kept as a memory of the scars of war and the times of the origin of Salzburg Global Seminar, were however politely declined.) Hotel General Manager Daniel Szelényi, who worked intimately with Chanel in the weeks leading to the show, said: “We were delighted that Chanel chose Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron as the location for its pre-Fall show. “Working with Chanel was a tremendous pleasure and we are especially grateful for the detailed improvements they were able to deliver, which are lasting contributions to the transformation and stewardship of this beautiful building.” Vice President Clare Shine, who was invited to the show along with Szelényi, added: “Reinhardt famously said that he had ‘lived every room, every table, every chair, every light, and every picture’ here at Schloss Leopoldskron. That Karl Lagerfeld has taken the same approach with his show is a great honor to Reinhardt.” “This was an excellent year for Salzburg Global Seminar and Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron,” remarked President Stephen L. Salyer. “Our program each year inspires fresh thinking around urgent global issues, and provides a home away from home for more than 1000 Fellows from six continents, from college students to secretaries of state. With the renovation of our facilities, Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron offers a unique environment for this work, and also helps subsidize our non-profit programs. “We take pride in our role as stewards of this historic place. As Salzburg Global Seminar approaches its 70th anniversary in 2017, we salute the staff, volunteers, and benefactors who make our preservation work possible. We look forward to sustaining Schloss Leopoldskron and to inspiring rising world leaders for generations to come.” 
Download the Salzburg Global Chronicle 2015 in full (PDF)  
READ MORE...
Supporting Thoughtful, Committed Citizens
Supporting Thoughtful, Committed Citizens
Louise Hallman, Alex Jackson and Sudeshan Reddy 
Nearly 70 years after Margaret Mead praised the first Salzburg Seminar in American Studies and its “committed citizens,” Salzburg Global continues to provide a safe space for current and future leaders to tackle burning issues in their homelands. This distance can enable them to listen to and learn from each other, and find solutions across geographic and ideological boundaries. “Civil society is the society of citizens—but citizens are not just those who have a passport but who actively work to make a country better… The more active citizens we have, the stronger and better the country will be,” said one veteran Russian civil society activist during the Salzburg Global program Russian Civil Society: Building Bridges to the Future. His sentiments echoed Margaret Mead, faculty of the first-ever Salzburg Seminar in American Studies who famously stated: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” Ever since that first session, Salzburg Global Seminar has sought to support civil society and strengthen democratic processes and engagement. While civil society is represented at almost every Salzburg Global program – in addition to building the next generation of “thoughtful, committed citizens” with the year-round Global Citizenship Program – three 2014 programs in particular sought to support Fellows in their struggles toward democracy, stability, and inclusivity in the “post-revolution” Middle East and North Africa, against the increasing restrictions in Putin’s Russia, and for LGBT rights the world over. Civil society has an important role to play in tackling all these issues. Countries in transition, such as Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, and Yemen (the four focus countries of Salzburg Global’s ongoing Reform and Transformation in the Middle East and North Africa [link to mena.salzburgglobal.org] series), face deep-rooted problems, which politicians or “official” representatives alone will not solve; all stakeholders need to be engaged and included. “Ignore who is in charge and address the issues,” advised one Libyan Fellow to her Egyptian counterparts at the March program Strengthening Diversity and Inclusion in Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, and Yemen. The fluidity and complexity of the situation in the countries facing extreme transitions or increasing restrictions can sometimes thwart the plans made by well-intentioned civil society activists, academics, donors, and policymakers. Indeed, between the November 2013 program Getting Transition Right: A Rights-based Approach to Diversity and Inclusion and the follow-on program in March 2014, participants spoke of a sense of inertia at best and deterioration at worst. Following the participation of its founder Belabbès Benkredda in the November session, the Munathara Initiative, a Tunisia-based multimedia public debating platform, was inspired to expand to the four focus countries, launching a series of debates on human rights, inclusion, and diversity. But outside of Tunisia where there had been some progress, Fellows were much less positive. One Egyptian Fellow, who had been outspoken at Salzburg Global programs in 2012 and 2013, asked to have his name withheld from the 2014 program report for fear of reprisals. Two Libyan Fellows had to flee and seek asylum in Europe following attempts on their lives in retaliation for their work. Although progress had been made by March, the outbreak of war in Yemen had led many of those Fellows who could, to leave. For the Russian Fellows who attended the Russian Civil Society Symposium, the situation could also be bleak and dangerous. Oleg Kozlovsky, a seasoned political activist, was detained at the airport on his return from Salzburg; he was released after officers took his photo and fingerprints. So if the situation is changing too quickly to formulate long-term plans and Fellows can even face detention for their participation, why come to Salzburg? “The [November program] was quite significant in two major ways,” explains Egyptian Fellow Sherine El Taraboulsi. “One, it allowed us to ask questions at a distance. While we are aware of the different dimensions of the problems that face the region, we are too close to it to be able to analyze it. Salzburg brought that distance while providing a platform for us to freely discuss our ideas. “Two, it managed to bring together academics and practitioners, and that is very unique, because we rarely speak to one another.” This bringing together of disparate views is a hallmark of Salzburg Global. Even within civil society, there is not necessarily a homogeny of opinion or approach. Within Russia, a great level of distrust exists among various sectors of civil society. The political activists (who want to change or even overhaul the entire system) accuse the direct aid groups (who provide disaster relief or services not offered by the state) of being short-sighted and state collaborators, especially those receiving state funding. But the political activists’ clashes with the state earn them the distrust and ire of direct aid and civic activist groups who blame them for provoking the government crackdowns that affect the whole sector. They are also frequently characterized as foreign-backed, disrupting the development of civil society, and the lives of ordinary Russians. It thus became clear in Salzburg that bridges need to be built not only between civil society and the state, but also within civil society itself. After the session, Sarah Lindemann-Komarova, founder of the Siberian Civic Initiatives Support Center, said: “A summary of [the program outcomes] is simple: no easy answers, more questions. But that does not mean it was a failure. It is no small accomplishment to capture an accurate description of the status of civil society in Russia today… “The identification of questions that need answers and the clarification of internal fault lines provide an essential foundation for a step forward in this 25-year-old work-in-progress. It is not clear if that step will be taken; it is only certain that, if it is not, there is no hope of improved status, increased bargaining power, and self-determination for civil society actors.” Outside Schloss Leopoldskron, positive bridges were built in Berlin, where members of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum met in May 2014 to examine how LGBT issues are addressed by ministries of foreign affairs and their embassies, and how LGBT rights organizations, embassies, and other actors can build closer networks and more effective relationships. During the two days of discussions between the Fellows and representatives from agencies including the German and Dutch Foreign Ministries and the European External Action Service, German Federal Government Commissioner for Human Rights and Humanitarian Aid, Christoph Straesser said: “The question before us, as societies, organizations, and persons wishing to protect and promote human rights, is how to halt negative developments and further advance positive developments. There is no simple answer to this question. “To help us identify answers, we work with the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum in order to establish a global space to reflect upon and advance LGBT and human rights discussions around the world.” As Klaus Mueller, founder and chair of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum, wrote in the session report for Creating Long-Term Global Networks to Sustain LGBT Human Rights Organizations: “There are no easy answers and no ‘short-cuts’ to supporting, enhancing and sustaining LGBT rights. What does make a difference is ongoing networking, engagement, and dialogue between German diplomatic missions and LGBT human rights organizations… “For a network to truly live and thrive, there is no substitute for face-to-face interaction. The momentum of Salzburg was sustained in Berlin through the processes of discovery, empathy, and learning. It must now continue.” Continuing the spirit of Margaret Mead, Salzburg Global’s programs on strengthening democracy and civil society will support and expand the networks of thoughtful and committed citizens for generations to come.
Download the Salzburg Global Chronicle 2015 in full (PDF)
READ MORE...
Conflict Transformation Through Culture
Conflict Transformation Through Culture
Louise Hallman and Alex Jackson 
Salzburg Global Seminar has long appreciated the power of culture to transform conflict. When the first fellows met in 1947, former enemies came together to discuss American politics, economics — and culture. With 2014 marking the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War One, Salzburg global chose this commemorative year to focus its transformative power of the arts series on peace-building, peacemaking, and conflict prevention through the arts. Why do people continue to practice and engage in the arts during times of war and conflict? And conversely, why do people assume that they do not? As the 63 artists, directors, activists, policymakers, educators, and cultural actors from 27 countries across six continents who participated in Conflict Transformation through Culture: Peace-Building and the Arts could attest: art certainly does still take place during times of conflict – but to what end? The role the arts can play in transforming conflict varies depending on where, when, with, and for whom the art is being created. The closer to the space and time of a conflict people are, the less likely the art produced is to center around the conflict. In fact, the vast majority of the art created there – be that theater, music, dance, or any other medium – is focused on anything but the conflict, with the purpose of forgetting about the war. People there are not creating art because of the conflict, but in spite of it. Also in this space, one finds a lot of art for children, enabling them to distance themselves from the conflict that engulfs their daily lives. Art participation for children, especially musical, is also valuable in post-conflict situations. As Edinburgh University music professor emeritus and composer Nigel Osbourne shared during the session: “One of the first things that music can do is get children back into being happy and back into playing together and trusting others.” Music therapy can also help children who have suffered “acoustic shock,” helping children reprocess “sounds in a way that is pleasurable and much more stimulating rather than frightening.” It is not just those who lived through the conflict who can benefit from arts-based peace-building. In Cambodia, Salzburg Global Fellow Phloeun Prim, executive director of Cambodia Living Arts (CLA), works to revive traditional artisanal crafts early lost in the Khmer Rouge-led genocide, and encourage young artists in Cambodia to explore their traditional roots. “Within a generation, Cambodian identity and culture could have been lost forever,” explained Prim. “Since we started, there’s a whole new generation of emerging artists that have come out of our program… The country can now be seen to be moving forward.” In Northern Ireland, theater is being used to help confront the aggression and resentment that remains despite the peace agreements of the 1990s. “How do you deal with the levels of aggression that inevitably come from a long lineage of war?” asks theater director Paula McFetridge [link to Paula McFetridge interview]. Her answer has been to enact theater in non-theater spaces – taxi cabs, synagogues, the infamous Falls Road – to help take people out of their comfort zones, challenge community-specific narratives of “The Troubles,” and help individuals and communities rethink the public spaces they have long considered out of bounds. It is thanks to all these valuable contributions that arts and culture can offer in transforming conflict, aired at the Salzburg Global session, that the European Commission recommended culture should be “mainstreamed” into peace-building activities. This was the leading recommendation made after a one-day seminar entitled Culture and Conflicts: The Case of Ukraine, which was organized in November 2014, at the behest of Salzburg Global Fellow Alain Ruche, as a follow-on event from the April session in Salzburg. Held by the European External Action Service (EEAS) in collaboration with Salzburg Global Seminar and NGO More Europe – external cultural relations [hyperlink to org], the program was supported by the European Union and its Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace (IcSP) with a view to providing a better understanding of the culture-conflict nexus through the lens of the conflict in Ukraine. As in Salzburg, the follow-on seminar saw intensive discussions among participants, centered around culture as a soft, peaceful tool to address hard, serious challenges and transform seemingly stale, “dead-end” conflict situations; culture as a tool to mobilize and engage the wider population; culture as a means of stimulating dialogue, communication, and eventually understanding; the risks connected to the use and abuse of culture and cultural identities; and the need to integrate culture into general EU policies to make better use of its positive potential. To this end, the IcSP is expected to open a call for grant applications in summer 2015. “As an institution founded to promote peace and dialogue between former enemies in the wake of the Second World War, and given our programmatic focus on the transformative power of the arts, we are heartened by the EU’s adoption of our recommendations,” said Salzburg Global Program Director for Culture and the Arts, Susanna Seidl-Fox. Since the session, Fellows have embarked on a number of collaborative projects, including a cultural heritage project in Turkey and Armenia, a project to develop an online platform for filmmakers in conflict areas, and a project for reinventing public spaces in divided communities. A further follow-on session – Living Arts in Post-Conflict Contexts: Practices, Partnerships & Possibilities – is planned for Cambodia in early 2016, led by Fellow Prim and CLA. Fellows are also leading calls for the UN to recognize the role culture and the arts can play in peace-building in the Sustainable Development Goals, the successors to the Millennium Development Goals. “We look forward to following and supporting these projects as they come to fruition,” enthused Seidl-Fox.
Download the Salzburg Global Chronicle 2015 in full (PDF)
READ MORE...
Innovation and the Collision of Ideas
Innovation and the Collision of Ideas
Louise Hallman and Tanya Yilmaz 
How can you discourage bribery in Moldova? Or tackle water shortages in Mexico? Or reduce carbon emissions and deforestation in Indonesia? For the United Nations Development Program, the answers might be found in Salzburg, from enterprising media students from all over the world. Since it launched in 2007, the students and faculty of the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change have contributed to research on a multitude of topics, from young people’s attachment and possible addiction to social media and their mobile phones, to the use of images during the Beijing and London Olympics. In 2014, their research had real world impact as the 71 students teamed up with the United Nations Development Program to help the UN agency address real-life challenges in advancing the Millennium Development Goals and the post-2015 development agenda, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Led by Jennifer Colville, a policy advisor in the UNDP’s Knowledge, Innovation and Capacity Group (KICG), the students at the 2014 program, Civic Voices – Justice, Rights and Social Change, made proposals on how media can be used to address the challenges around youth unemployment and livelihoods, climate change, human rights, and corruption. The emerging field of “gamification” – the use of games to raise awareness and engage citizens on a pressing development issue, build empathy among those who might have differing opinions, and ultimately change people’s behavior with regard to the issue – is one particular area in which UNDP’s KICG is developing a growing interest. “UNDP is trying to be more innovative,” explains Colville [link to colville interview]. “One of the things we’re looking at is gamification. We’re also looking at a whole host of other things like behavioral science, foresighting, social innovation camps, labs, hubs, challenges… A key piece of the innovation agenda is the communications aspect of it. We’re trying to ‘work out loud’ or communicate more frequently throughout the entire process of development for a variety of reasons: so that more actors are aware of and become involved in the process, so that feedback can be heard as early on in the process as possible, and so that information and knowledge are shared more broadly across projects. Better communications can help us design and deliver more effective projects with our partners.” As part of their more innovative approach, the UNDP hosts regular research and development (R&D) events, and it was through such an event that Colville and the UNDP became involved in the Salzburg Academy, thanks to the Emerson Engagement Lab, led by Salzburg Academy faculty member Eric Gordon at Emerson College, Boston, USA. “Last year our regional [R&D] event in Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States (ECIS) was on behavioral science and gamification, and Eric, with the Emerson Engagement Lab, was invited to that. Then we had him come and speak to colleagues in New York and he started to work with a number of our country offices as well. And he said ‘We’ve got this [Academy] going – it would be great for you to come and give the development perspective!’” Colville explained. The 2014 Academy’s group work builds on Gordon’s Ithiel de Sola Pool Endowed Lecture on the Impact of Communications Technology on Society and Politics at the 2013 Academy, in which Gordon laid out how, by playing-learning games such as 1990s school hit, Oregon Trail, and direct impact games like Darfur is Dying (where one must keep their refugee camp functioning in the face of possible attacks by Janjaweed militias), opportunities for learning and empathy can be realized in a much more accessible manner than by simply reading books or listening to lectures. It is this sort of innovative thinking that Colville was looking to harness from the 2014 cohort of Salzburg Academy students.  “There is a tendency to go towards the new kinds of media but one of the groups I was speaking to basically felt that even that was old hat. ‘An app is so 2013!’” laughed Colville. “And so that’s great because they want to push [innovation] even further, and that’s what we at UNDP hope to get from our interaction with young people. As we develop programs for young people, it’s really important for us to work with them to push boundaries. “I think what it would be great to have from them is that out-of-the-box thinking. There is the new and the ‘out there’ thinking that I’m looking for – the different perspective they bring is invaluable,” she added. Over three weeks, under guidance in-person from Colville and Gordon and via Skype from UNDP country offices around the world, students from 23 different countries developed Media Action Plans (MAPs) of a campaign, reporting tool or game to tackle real-world issues.  The students’ solutions included: “DROPIT” –  a website using GPS mapping to catalog water scarcity in Mexico; an Instagram campaign – #WEThiopia – to raise awareness about poor water access in Ethiopia; “i-Toil” (India To Overcome Immoral Labor) – an online petition calling for the implementation of legislation to protect domestic workers in India; “Youth Bridge” – a whistleblowing and teacher review app in Armenia to counter corruption in education; and “Raise The Roof” – an app offering advice on urban agriculture in Indonesia.  The team behind the Moldovan proposal – the game “Bribe?” which offers Moldovan citizens a better understanding of the motivations behind corrupt teachers, students, and parents – was featured on the Voices from Eurasia blog by the United Nations Development Program in Europe and Central Asia. The game is now being further developed and designed by the Engagement Lab at Emerson College, led by Gordon. Following the success of the 2014 partnership, the UNDP, together with the Red Cross, will be returning to work with the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change in the summer of 2015.  Colville congratulated the 2014 students on their “inspiring and encouraging” work, adding, “I know [my colleagues] are very excited about looking at what some of these opportunities might be for their country offices.” Colville and her colleagues might be turning to Millennials to help find solutions to the world’s development challenges, but that’s not to say that they are no longer listening to the older generation. “The demographic shift is calling for a response and an engagement with youth – we cannot ignore it and we don’t want to ignore it,” says Colville. “But we’re not only engaging the youth; it’s part of a broader effort that the UNDP is trying to undertake with our international partners to reach out to a variety of voices that we haven’t traditionally heard from. It is about hearing all these different voices – that’s where this collision of ideas happens and where the great ideas can emerge.” 
Download the Salzburg Global Chronicle 2015 in full (PDF)
READ MORE...
Bringing the World to Salzburg
Bringing the World to Salzburg
Benjamin Glahn and Louise Hallman 
Salzburg Global Seminar convenes highly diverse groups of people to achieve its mission of challenging current and future leaders to solve problems of global concern. That diversity is reflected in the range of ages, experience and geographies of Salzburg Global Fellows. Our Scholarship Program allows us to achieve that diversity, moving beyond “usual suspects” to identify innovative ideas – and provide young leaders with the chance to expand their global networks. Founded in 1947 by an Austrian and two Americans, Salzburg Global Seminar bridges boundaries – intellectual as well as geographic – in everything it does. At a disrupted, unstable moment in history, its youthful founders believed their generation could overcome the ravages of war, rebuild Europe, and forge a new global compact. They believed that ideas were essential to drive change, and that small groups of individuals – or as Margaret Mead called them: “thoughtful, committed citizens” – could bring those ideas to bear. During the Cold War, Salzburg offered a rare gathering place for participants from East and West, bridging a dangerous ideological divide. With support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and others, Salzburg Global also began to attract to its programs rising leaders from Latin America, Africa, and the Middle East. As the Asia region became ever more prominent, Salzburg Global increasingly tackled problems of global interest and recruited participants from every continent. In 1988, The Nippon Foundation established Salzburg Global’s first endowed scholarship fund, enabling emerging leaders from developing countries to attend Salzburg Global programs. From its inception until the present day, Salzburg Global’s Scholarship Program has supported more than 5000 young leaders from 95 countries, from Armenia to Zimbabwe, Bangladesh to Venezuela, to attend its programs. In 2014, of the 1041 Salzburg Global Fellows and faculty who came to Schloss Leopoldskron, 200* were able to participate thanks to either full or partial scholarships, covering their fees, accommodation and travel. Salzburg Global has a remarkable track record for identifying and connecting rising political, business, civil society, public interest, cultural, and thought leaders, and the Scholarship Program ensures internationally diverse, non-standard voices are able to communicate on a wide array of issues. South African, Eastern European, and Arab Fellows shared perspectives on working through profound transition periods at programs on the post-“Arab Spring” Middle East; Korean experts shared their research directly with Ghanaian business leaders during a session on expanding African rural enterprise; and Cambodians shared their country’s efforts to overcome its genocidal history with Rwandans and Bosnians during the multi-year Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention Initiative. Salzburg Global scholarships – such as those supported by the HDH Wills 1965 Charitable Trust to bring Rhodes Scholars to Salzburg – have further expanded opportunities for young leaders to engage in global problem solving. Salzburg Global works with groups with demonstrated success in identifying future leaders – such as the Rhodes Trust – to ensure its programs attract the most outstanding rising talent from across the world. For many of these scholarship recipients, participation in Salzburg Global programs offers a seminal moment to develop new professional networks and opportunities. Salzburg Global currently works with 30 scholarship providers in nine countries – including foundations, national governments, private corporations, and universities, as well as individual supporters. By 2020, Salzburg Global Seminar seeks to support 25 percent of its participants through its Scholarship Program, with scholarships tailored to meet the needs of diverse regions of the world. Through our ongoing commitment to bring young, diverse, non-standard voices to Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg Global hopes to continue to expand this network of “thoughtful, committed citizens” for years to come. * This number does not include university undergraduate and graduate students who receive scholarships to participate in Salzburg Global Academies such as the Global Citizenship Program, the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change, and the Cutler Fellows Program. For more information email: scholarships@SalzburgGlobal.org Testimonials “Salzburg Global’s value does not end when the week is over. The discussions do not end when everyone has caught their flights home: in fact the discussions continue back in my office with my colleagues, enriching our understanding of the work with which we are engaged on a daily basis, and informing the development of programs and materials as we go forward. ” Tracey Peterson, Education Director, Cape Town Holocaust Memorial Museum, Cape Town, South Africa “The Young Cultural Innovators Forum created in effect a kind of global synergy that empowers us to keep up working and fighting for things in a national context, knowing that we are not alone and that are people all around the world we can lean on for help, advice, and support.” Kelly Diapouli, Director, BUSART, France/Greece “I think Salzburg Global Seminar has given a voice to the voiceless. We are the voiceless, truth be told. What we say used to remain within our lecture rooms, back home. Anything you say here goes to 72 different people, 23 different countries.” Tony Ojwang, Student, Daystar University, Kenya “My experience at Salzburg Global not only allowed me to learn and share experiences with some of the most interesting people I've ever met – some of them are now good friends and excellent connections for my network – it also reminded me why I believe in the power of arts and culture for the development of society and economy and why I want to make our world a more creative one.” Felipe Buitrago, Consultant, Inter-American Development Bank, USA “The symposium is one of the most significant and effective LGBT-related conferences I have ever attended… a vibrant and unparalleled space where I learn from participants from different backgrounds, regions and cultures about their passions, inputs, improvements, and setbacks related to sexual orientation and gender identity.” Dan Zhou, Lawyer and LGBT Human Rights Activist, China Partners We thank all our donors for their continued support. Endowments Ann M. Hoefle Memorial FellowshipErnest A. Bates African FellowshipHuffington Family FellowshipElizabeth MacMillan FellowshipMcKnight Foundation FellowshipThe Nippon FoundationUniversity of Pennsylvania Law School FellowshipLlewellyn Thompson Memorial FellowshipOnodera FellowshipWinthrop Family Fellowship Grants The Andrew W. Mellon FoundationAustrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy (BMWFW)Austrian National BankCalouste Gulbenkian FoundationCapital Group CompaniesDavidson CollegeFondation Adelman pour L’EducationHaverford CollegeHDH Wills 1965 Charitable TrustJapan FoundationKorea FoundationThe Mexican Business CouncilMiddlebury CollegeSalzburg UniversityStanford UniversityTexas Tech UniversityThe US Embassy in the Slovak RepublicUniversity of DelawareUniversity of PennsylvaniaUS Air Force Academy
READ MORE...
Ecosystems Of Philanthropy
Ecosystems Of Philanthropy
Louise Hallman and Nancy Smith 
Ecosystems are complex. They incorporate living organisms like plants, nonliving components such as water, and the complex interactions between these different elements which have varying impacts upon each other. Removal or expansion of one part of an ecosystem can have deep impacts on others; small tweaks or introductions of new elements can have long-term, unexpected (and possibly unwanted) consequences. If we were to imagine the “ecosystem” of philanthropy for social change – also arguably a complex system – what would we see? A simple flow chart? A forest? An octopus?! (Yes, an octopus – read on…) In March 2014, Salzburg Global Seminar and Hivos convened 45 experts from philanthropy, finance, international policy, research, and social activism to examine urgent questions related to channeling more money toward social transformation, and to do so in ways that maximize the positive impact of those monies. The Salzburg Global Fellows were asked to expand their (eco)systems thinking beyond philanthropic funding and identify core elements of a healthier and more balanced ecosystem that could enable and support social transformation. Just as the participants came from many different backgrounds from across the philanthropic spectrum, so too were the ecosystem models distinct and varied. One could see the system of philanthropy or social change in the form of a flow chart, with funds flowing into different mechanisms that align and work together to the same goal. But given the complexity of ecosystems – and that of philanthropy for social change – some considered this overly simplistic. Some of the participants were inspired to envision philanthropy for social change as an octopus with the potential to be both beautiful and beastly, with the tentacles representing the multiple forms of funding available to propel social change forward: foundations, market-based philanthropy, impact investing, government aid, etc. Currently, each “tentacle” of funding acts relatively independently of the others; they may be unaware of what the others are doing or even fighting each other, pulling in different directions. An octopus has the ability to both adapt to and obscure its surroundings. Highly intelligent and well-meaning at first sight, it can move unexpectedly and act ruthlessly. If the octopus’ tentacles continue to pull in different directions, the whole animal (representative of the progress of social change) will remain confused and ineffectual. But, if the values of deep social transformation can be absorbed into its central intelligence system, there is a chance that the octopus can “tame” its tentacles, apply its considerable skills for good, and advance social change. Only when the octopus’ tentacles work together in concert can the beautiful beast move forward and, in turn, positively impact its surroundings. Admittedly, the octopus in itself is not an ecosystem; it remains a small creature in the vast ocean of global finance, but it is able to have more effect on its surroundings than its size would otherwise suggest – an analogy many in Salzburg felt apt for philanthropy for social change. One could build a more expansive vision of the ecosystem of philanthropy by imagining one of the most complex natural ecosystems: a forest. Forests have a diversity of vegetation: towering trees – long-term programs that run for decades and are not cut down or expected to offer a “return on investment” before reaching maturation; mid-canopy trees that do not have as long life spans but are still given time to grow before being harvested, providing returns on investment; and young seedlings that have only just been planted or sprung from the fruits of other efforts. The diversity of trees (programs) is vital for social change, and so these programs of varying growth periods are also of varying “species”: single-issues programs that grow quite independently of the surrounding plants; wide-ranging programs with branches that help prop up other organizations, providing fruit that sprout other trees and offering leafy nourishment (advice and experience) to saplings (but there is a risk they grow too large and absorb the funds or obscure the work of their smaller counterparts); and vines that cling to larger programs. There are the “evergreen” programs that run continually, and those that lie dormant before springing back into action at the appropriate time. All these trees need nourishment – and here water is money. Without the rain (money), programs can shrivel and die; but an unexpected deluge can have a negative impact, with programs unable to respond quickly enough to make best use of the funds and at risk of being drowned out. Some plants need more water than others, some conserve and store water better than others, and some trees transpire moisture (money) back into the atmosphere to be recycled and rained down again elsewhere (i.e. impact investing). As in a real forest, not all of these trees will survive. In addition to well-funded “healthy” programs, the forest is also home to deadwood – programs that have been part-funded but abandoned or unsuccessful – and quick growing trees that are expected to produce a speedy return before they’ve had chance to properly leaf. After all, this forest of programs has been planted by different people, at different times, and for different purposes. Some programs will be planted by small NGOs and watered by teams of crowdfunders; some will be planted by large foundations that regularly “rain money” but leave the arboriculture to the NGOs; some are planted with the expectation of producing fruit that will sprout other programs. Some programs will prove to be “invasive species” (often planted by well-meaning but misdirected or mistrusted donors), planted in areas that do not want or need these programs, possibly displacing community-appropriate programs or other natural inhabitants. Despite these analogies, questions still abound. For the octopus, how should the values of social transformation be fed into it and by whom? If the multiple tentacles cannot be “tamed,” can we afford to cut one off and allow something else to grow in its place? In the philanthropy forest, if money is rain, where did the water come from in the first place? How do we introduce more money into the system in a healthy, sustainable manner? And how can we be sure that the programs we plant and nourish are contributing to social transformation and not just superficial, short-term change? How do we measure the value we have as philanthropists?  The Salzburg Global–Hivos program was intended to extend current thinking and catalyze new thinking about the role of philanthropy in supporting transformation, and the role of money in particular. Michael Edwards, in his think piece Beauty and the Beast: Can Money Ever Foster Social Transformation? (provided as the starting point for discussions at the session) contends that the current funding “system” for social transformation is out of balance: too much emphasis is placed on, and too many resources channeled to, a few select approaches while others – arguably those that are more “democratic” in nature, and in which “success” is less tied to financial/market outcomes – are increasingly eschewed. Identifying the core elements of a healthy system may help us to increase the ability of philanthropy, and money in particular, to support social transformation, and help the diverse – and sometimes divisive – actors and approaches to understand how they can work together more effectively towards shared goals. A longer version of this article was first published in the September 2014 edition of Alliance magazine: www.alliancemagazine.org Salzburg Global Fellows are eligible for a 20% discount on subscriptions to Alliance. Email press@SalzburgGlobal.org for details.
READ MORE...
Not the Typical Industry Gathering
Not the Typical Industry Gathering
Benjamin Glahn and Louise Hallman 
Since 2011, Salzburg Global Seminar has convened an annual, high-level forum focused on critical challenges of financial regulation following the global financial crisis. The annual Forum on Finance in a Changing World facilitates critical analysis of the changing regulatory environment, comparison of practical experience, understanding of technology-driven transformations, and involves senior bankers, regulators, and policymakers from the US, Asia and Europe, as well as international financial services firms, consultancies, auditors, law firms and other professional service providers – but that doesn’t make it a typical industry gathering. For many in the finance and banking sector, industry meetings rarely enable in-depth, informal, and off-the-record opportunities for discussions on the key challenges facing the global financial markets. The Salzburg Global Forum for Finance in a Changing World is different. “Never have I been to a [session] like this where people don’t leave the room every five minutes for side-meetings or conference calls. That this did not happen [here] marks the excellence of the [session],” said one participant after 2014’s program The Future of Banking: Is There a Sustainable Business Model for Banks?  How is it that Salzburg Global is able to attract high level figures such as Andreas Dombret, a Member of the Executive Board of Deutsche Bundesbank; Douglas Flint, the Group Chairman of HSBC Holdings; Wim Mijs, the Chief Executive of the European Banking Federation; and Paul Volcker, former Chairman of the US Federal Reserve? And not only keep them engaged while in Salzburg, but persuade them to return to Salzburg Global Seminar year after year? The reason is four-fold. First, Schloss Leopoldskron provides a secluded and informal meeting place, away from the hectic global banking centers, where participants bring a broad array of perspectives and expertise and are able to look beyond their immediate technical and external pressures. Second, like all Salzburg Global programs, the session is all held under the Chatham House Rule, meaning that everyone present can speak candidly. Although the ideas and proposals may be shared beyond the gates of Schloss Leopoldskron, ideas are not attributed, enabling participants to speak as individuals rather than on behalf of their institutions. This is true even when there are journalists on-site [see BELOW]. Third, Salzburg Global Seminar program staff work closely with an advisory council [see BELOW] to ensure that the annual topics, speakers, and participants are addressing the most critical issues facing global financial services. The annual Forum, now in its fifth year, facilitates strategic analysis and critical thinking about changing regulatory and economic environments, comparative practice, technology-driven transformations, and emerging ethical questions. Since its launch in 2011 with the session New Rules for Global Finance: Which kinds of regulation are useful and which are counterproductive?, the Forum has tackled global differences in financial regulation (2012: Financial Regulation: Bridging Global Differences, shadow banking (2013: Out of the Shadows: Regulation for the Non-Banking Financial Sector, sustainable business models for banks (2014: The Future of Banking: Is There a Sustainable Business Model for Banks?, and in 2015, the 50 expert participants will examine financial intermediation in The Future of Financial Intermediation: Banking, Securities Markets, or Something New? The intensive two-day Forum includes panel-led discussions, in-depth working groups, and an Oxford-style evening debate. Speakers come from leading institutions, and include both high-level decision makers and top young professionals from diverse backgrounds. As one Fellow put it: “The level of the participants was incredible. I believe that no other place in the world can host such an array of high-ranking bankers, regulators, thinkers, and policymakers.” Fourth, the Salzburg Forum on Finance in a Changing World is not a typical industry gathering. Salzburg Global Seminar reaches beyond “the usual suspects” and encourages a broad array of financial and programmatic participation. Numerous partners, sponsors, and co-sponsors support the program, without any single institution exerting influence on the overall program. Partners and sponsors have included international banks like HSBC and Deutsche Bank; consultancy firms such as Ernst & Young and Oliver Wyman; financial services firms Dynex Capital Inc. and The Cynosure Group; and law firms including Cleary Gottlieb and Davis Polk, as well as central banks and educational institutions. This sponsorship model, spearheaded by Salzburg Global Vice President of Business Affairs Benjamin Glahn, has resulted in the Forum’s ability to attract top international financial actors as well as offer scholarships to rising stars from across the world. “As the Salzburg Global Forum on Finance in a Changing World enters its fifth year, the Forum has become a unique annual program for senior level bankers, regulators, and others in the financial services sector to engage with each other on forward looking issues and challenges,” says Salzburg Global Program Director Tatsiana Lintouskaya. “Building on its diverse base of sponsors and supporters, and with the guidance of its Advisory Committee, the Forum has become a strong and sustainable platform for tackling the toughest challenges to the integrity of global financial systems.” READ MORE: finance.SalzburgGlobal.org READ MORE: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/go/552 Live from Schloss Leopoldskron Like all Salzburg Global programs, sessions within the Finance in a Changing World series are all held under the Chatham House Rule, meaning ideas and proposals can only be shared outside of the session without attribution. But such a high-level meeting inevitably attracts attention from the press. To ensure that both the participants are able to speak candidly and the media are able to report from the session, Salzburg Global invited Bloomberg TV to broadcast live and exclusively from the terrace of Schloss Leopoldskron – outside of the off-the-record discussions going on in Parker Hall. Bloomberg TV’s Jonathan Ferro interviewed Salzburg Global Fellows Wim Mijs, the newly appointed head of the European Banking Federation, HSBC Chair Douglas Flint, Deutsche Bundesbank’s Andreas Dombret, and former Bank of England Deputy Governor Paul Tucker, with Ferro appearing live throughout the second day of the session for the broadcaster’s shows On the Move and The Pulse. Mijs spoke about achieving “legal certainty” over the size of fines handed down to lenders for breaking rules; Flint answered questions about the increase in compliance costs at the bank over the last four years; Dombret told Ferro about European Central Bank’s stress tests and risks to financial stability in the Euro area; and Tucker, speaking with Bloomberg’s Boris Groendahl, also discussed the future of London as a financial center and the impact of Bank of England policy on the UK mortgage market. WATCH THE VIDEOS: finance.SalzburgGlobal.org/multimedia Advisory Council Douglas Flint (Chair), Group Chairman, HSBC Holdings Andreas Dombret, Member of the Executive Board, Deutsche Bundesbank Ed Greene, Senior Counsel, Cleary Gottlieb Patrick Kenadjian, Senior Counsel, Davis Polk Sandra O’Connor, Chief Regulatory Affairs Officer, JPMorgan Chase Randal Quarles, Managing Director, The Cynosure Group David Wright, Secretary-General, International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO)
Download the Salzburg Global Chronicle 2015 in full (PDF)
READ MORE...
Displaying results 1 to 7 out of 9
<< First < Previous 1-7 8-9 Next > Last >>